Question: What Is Racing Thoughts A Symptom Of?

While racing thoughts are most commonly described in people with bipolar disorder and sleep apnea, they are also common with anxiety disorders, OCD, and other psychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Racing thoughts are also associated with sleep deprivation, hyperthyroidism.

What do racing thoughts feel like?

Racing thoughts can increase your anxiety or feelings of unease and can disrupt your concentration. When you have racing thoughts, you may feel like: Your mind is going a mile a minute. You aren’t able to slow down your thoughts.

Are racing thoughts a symptom of anxiety?

Racing thoughts—fast, repetitive thought patterns about a particular topic—are a common feature of anxiety and other mental-health disorders. But they can happen any time you are in an anxious or stressed state, even if you are not experiencing other symptoms.

How do you slow down your thoughts?

One of the ways to stay centered is to pay attention to your breathing. Stop and take five long, deep breaths. Focus on your inhale and then your exhale. Slow, deep breathing has been proven to calm the body’s fight or flight response and calm you down.

Does Lithium help with racing thoughts?

Lithium is prescribed as a mood stabilizer for people who have bipolar disorder. It acts to help control the mania, hypomania, depression, and psychosis associated with the condition. Lithium is a naturally occurring element that was found, in the late 1800s, to have mood stabilizing properties.

How do you calm down anxiety?

Here are some helpful, actionable tips you can try the next time you need to calm down.

  • Breathe.
  • Admit that you’re anxious or angry.
  • Challenge your thoughts.
  • Release the anxiety or anger.
  • Visualize yourself calm.
  • Think it through.
  • Listen to music.
  • Change your focus.

How do you control repetitive thoughts?

Here are some ways you can work to calm your mind and stop racing thoughts:

  1. Use cognitive distancing. Our mind usually worries about things it is convinced are true but, most of the time, are actually not true.
  2. Use a mantra.
  3. Focus on the present.
  4. Write things down.
  5. Breathe.

How can I stop thinking too much?

If this feels like familiar territory to you, here are 10 simple ideas to free yourself from overthinking.

  • Awareness is the beginning of change.
  • Don’t think of what can go wrong, but what can go right.
  • Distract yourself into happiness.
  • Put things into perspective.
  • Stop waiting for perfection.
  • Change your view of fear.